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Amazon's Blowing Out Refurbished iPads, For One Day Only

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Unless you really need the iPad Pro (and you almost definitely do not), the standard, vanilla 2018 iPad is a terrific tablet for both consuming and creating media. It even works with the Apple Pencil, the first non-Pro iPad to do so.

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Even though Maryland voters can register online through 9 p.m., registration has already hit a record high. bsun.md/2CQ7jX9

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Even though Maryland voters can register online through 9 p.m., registration has already hit a record high. bsun.md/2CQ7jX9


Posted by HoCoTimes on Tuesday, October 16th, 2018 9:24pm
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17 hours ago
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Remembering Paul Allen

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Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen died yesterday at age 65. His cause of death was Non-Hodgkins Lymphoma, the same disease that nearly killed him back in 1983. Allen, who was every bit as important to the history of the personal computer as Bill Gates, had found an extra 35 years of life back then thanks to a bone marrow transplant. And from the outside looking-in, I’d say he made great use of those 35 extra years.

Of all the early PC guys, Allen was probably the most reclusive. Following his departure from Microsoft in 1983 I met him only four times. But prior to his illness Allen had been a major factor at Microsoft and at MITS, maker of the original Altair 8800 microcomputer for which Microsoft provided the BASIC interpreter and where Allen was later head of software.

Remember it was Allen not Gates, who travelled to Albuquerque and did the first BASIC demo for MITS in 1975.

That MITS job eventually became problematic when Bill Gates used it as a reason to demand 64 percent of Microsoft’s founder shares to Paul Allen’s 36 percent. It was probably the most expensive job in the history of work.

Most of the people who read this won’t have known Paul Allen as a programmer or software executive, just as the reclusive owner of the Portland Trailblazers and Seattle Seahawks.

The guy was a paradox, at once flamboyant and reserved. He owned the world’s largest yacht, called Octopus. That Boeing 757 Donald Trump flew in before becoming U.S. President was previously Allen’s, bought not to fly him but just to fetch guests to and from the yacht, wherever it was sailing in the world at the time.

Paul Allen was a man of great enthusiasms and appetites. In the 1980s it was playing the guitar and his fascination with Seattle native Jimi Hendrix, which led to the purchase of many, many guitars and the creation of what is now The Museum of Pop Culture, the first of several Allen museums. In more recent years he kept at Paine Field the Heritage Aviation Museum, one of the largest private collections of military aircraft. Though Allen was not, himself, a pilot, his planes could all fly, and do. And where Oracle’s Larry Ellison used to talk about buying a supersonic MiG-29 fighter, Paul Allen owned a supersonic MiG-29 fighter. I wonder if he ever flew in it?

Paul Allen paid for cool stuff. He kept the SETI Institute alive and looking for signs of extraterrestrial intelligence. He built the Allen Array of radio telescopes to help with that effort and to further explore the universe. He paid for SpaceShipOne and won the Ansari X-Prize. In recent years he had been pouring hundreds of millions into StratoLaunch, a new way of firing satellites into orbit from a giant six-engine aircraft built out of two Boeing 747-400s.

Hardly anything he tried made money, but who cared? Thanks to Microsoft he had more money than any individual could ever spend.

Paul Allen was an exceedingly polite man who came across as not just shy, but wary. This always confused me because of his willingness to make such big financial bets. Why was he so wary of people? The origin story for that attitude can be found in Allen’s autobiography, where he wrote of overhearing Bill Gates and Steve Ballmer allegedly plotting to get back Allen’s Microsoft shares when he was dying in the early 80s.

This wariness was reinforced by people around Allen who gained power by telling him to be suspicious, that nearly every stranger he met wanted something. Maybe it was true, but it always brought an element of sadness to him, at least it seemed that way to me.

And yet there were also moments of simple joy. Late one night 23 years ago in Albuquerque we were hungry. The only place still open was the drive-through at a nearby burger joint. Neither of us had a car, so we walked between cars, waiting to walk up to the window and order. And like just about every other billionaire I’ve ever met, Allen had no money, so dinner was on me.

He was a nice man and left us too soon.








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20 hours ago
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MIT Plans College For AI, Backed by $1 Billion

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Every major university is wrestling with how to adapt to the technology wave of artificial intelligence -- how to prepare students not only to harness the powerful tools of A.I., but also to thoughtfully weigh its ethical and social implications. A.I. courses, conferences and joint majors have proliferated in the last few years. But the Massachusetts Institute of Technology is taking a particularly ambitious step, creating a new college backed by a planned investment of $1 billion. Two-thirds of the funds have already been raised, M.I.T. said, in announcing the initiative on Monday. From a report: The linchpin gift of $350 million came from Stephen A. Schwarzman, chief executive of the Blackstone Group, the big private equity firm. The college, called the M.I.T. Stephen A. Schwarzman College of Computing, will create 50 new faculty positions and many more fellowships for graduate students. It is scheduled to begin in the fall semester next year, housed in other buildings before moving into its own new space in 2022. The goal of the college, said L. Rafael Reif, the president of M.I.T., is to "educate the bilinguals of the future." He defines bilinguals as people in fields like biology, chemistry, politics, history and linguistics who are also skilled in the techniques of modern computing that can be applied to them. But, he said, "to educate bilinguals, we have to create a new structure."

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23 hours ago
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As Companies Embrace AI, It's a Job-Seeker's Market

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An anonymous reader shares a report: Artificial intelligence is now being used in an ever-expanding array of products: cars that drive themselves; robots that identify and eradicate weeds; computers able to distinguish dangerous skin cancers from benign moles; and smart locks, thermostats, speakers and digital assistants that are bringing the technology into homes. At Georgia Tech, students interact with digital teaching assistants made possible by AI for an online course in machine learning. The expanding applications for AI have also created a shortage of qualified workers in the field. Although schools across the country are adding classes, increasing enrollment and developing new programs to accommodate student demand, there are too few potential employees with training or experience in AI. That has big consequences. Too few AI-trained job-seekers has slowed hiring and impeded growth at some companies, recruiters and would-be employers told Reuters. It may also be delaying broader adoption of a technology that some economists say could spur U.S. economic growth by boosting productivity, currently growing at only about half its pre-crisis pace. [...] U.S. government data does not track job openings or hires in artificial intelligence specifically, but online job postings tracked by jobsites including Indeed, Ziprecruiter and Glassdoor show job openings for AI-related positions are surging. AI job postings as a percentage of overall job postings at Indeed nearly doubled in the past two years, according to data provided by the company. Searches on Indeed for AI jobs, meanwhile increased just 15 percent.

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23 hours ago
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‘Bricks in the Loop’ provides cyber Airmen an innovative, low-cost training option

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As the cyber realm evolves, effects from cyberattacks are moving from the digital world to the physical one.
The “Bricks in the Loop” cyber-physical training platform at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland, Texas, helps 90th Cyberspace Operations Squadron members ready the Air Force’s Cyber Protection Teams. The CPTs defend priority Department of Defense networks and systems against malicious cyber-physical acts. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. R.J. Biermann)


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